The top fruit in season, or in fact, the only fruit in season in this part of the world is the surprisingly versatile rhubarb. Usually grown forced (in a space devoid of light) or outdoors, it brightens up any meal with its delicate pink hue. Most people use rhubarb in a dessert. You’ll find it in menus of restaurants all across the land. But we like to try it in savoury preparations, for example in a salad. Rhubarb leaves, remember, are poisonous because they contain oxalic acid. So it’s only the stalks you want to cook.

What are the benefits of this gift of nature? High levels of Vitamin K, Vitamin A, calcium and like most tart fruits, it’s also a great source for Vitamin C. Don’t forget that it also contains a lot of fibre – you can tell from the structure of the stalks. While it’s too tart to enjoy raw (although we sometimes love snacking on a thinly-sliced sliver while prepping our food), you can still add it to salads with a little bit of preparation done in the oven.

Want a great rhubarb salad recipe? Here’s a recipe that uses contrasting flavours of balsamic vinegar and honey. And it will be a great opportunity to use up any Urbangrains Feta and Olive Oil you have lying around.

http://foodfacts.mercola.com/rhubarb.html

We also love the suggestions of rhubarb used raw in a salad with orange and fennel or beetroot. But the most interesting recipe we have come across so far (besides all the lovely desserts) is this one from Dinner with Julie. She makes a rhubarb vinaigrette that adds texture and a hint of magic to your otherwise simple salad. And you finish with a lovely light pink-not quite coral dressing that adds another dimension to your food. We know what we’re going to make for our next dinner party!

http://www.dinnerwithjulie.com/2011/07/15/rhubarb-vinaigrette/

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